What is the TNR Program

Trap-neuter-return (TNR) is a program through which free-roaming, street cats or feral cats are

humanely trapped, sterilized and medically treated, and returned to the outdoor locations where they were found. Kittens still young enough to be socialized and friendly adult cats are typically placed in foster care for eventual adoption into homes as companion animals rather than returned to the outdoors.Cats found suffering with terminal or untreatable illnesses or injuries are humanely euthanized.

Preparing for trapping

  1. Assess the cats and their environment. Do they appear to be stray or feral; are there kittens and/or nursing mothers; are there ill or injured cats?
  2. Secure a holding/recovery area where the cats can wait for surgery (if not immediate) and recover after surgery.
  3. Coordinate with a veterinarian or clinic to perform the surgery and provide other medical treatment
  4. Withhold food (but not water) for about 24 hours before trapping.

Trapping

  1. Bait and set the traps in a safe location, using as many traps as there are cats
  2. Wait patiently nearby but out of sight, for cats to enter the traps and the traps to close.
  3. Quickly cover each occupied trap with a cover or sheet, which helps to calm the cat withi
  4. Safely transport the cats in their traps to the clinic or holding area

 

Neutering: Medical care and socialization

  1. When ready, a veterinarian performs spay or neuter surgery and provides other medical attention as needed.
  2. During the surgery of feral cats, ear-tipping (removing 3/8 inch or 1 cm from the tip of the left ear; proportionally smaller in a kitten) identifies that the cat has been neutered and treated, when later seen from a distance
  3. Vaccinations are provided as arranged in advance. Common vaccines include rabies and FVRCP, “the ‘distemper’ (panleukopenia) and respiratory virus vaccine”.
  4. Cats found suffering with terminal or untreatable illnesses or injuries are humanely euthanized.
  5. When the vet deems that the cats are ready to leave the clinic, transport them to the recovery area, and monitor them for at least 24 hours.

Releasing the cats

  1. If the original location is safe, transport the feral cats there and safely release them from their traps or carriers.
  2. Keep tame cats and kittens in foster care until they are adopted.If there are insufficient resources to foster or shelter, the cats may be returned to outdoor locations in the same manner as feral cats.
  3. Feeders of the outdoor locations, providing food, shelter, and medical care, and watching for any new abandoned cats requiring trapping.
Preparing for trapping
Neutering Medical care and socialization
Releasing the cats

What is the TNR Program

Trap-neuter-return (TNR) is a program through which free-roaming, street cats or feral cats are

humanely trapped, sterilized and medically treated, and returned to the outdoor locations where they were found. Kittens still young enough to be socialized and friendly adult cats are typically placed in foster care for eventual adoption into homes as companion animals rather than returned to the outdoors.Cats found suffering with terminal or untreatable illnesses or injuries are humanely euthanized.

Preparing for trapping

  1. Assess the cats and their environment. Do they appear to be stray or feral; are there kittens and/or nursing mothers; are there ill or injured cats?
  2. Secure a holding/recovery area where the cats can wait for surgery (if not immediate) and recover after surgery.
  3. Coordinate with a veterinarian or clinic to perform the surgery and provide other medical treatment
  4. Withhold food (but not water) for about 24 hours before trapping.

Trapping

  1. Bait and set the traps in a safe location, using as many traps as there are cats
  2. Wait patiently nearby but out of sight, for cats to enter the traps and the traps to close.
  3. Quickly cover each occupied trap with a cover or sheet, which helps to calm the cat withi
  4. Safely transport the cats in their traps to the clinic or holding area

 

Preparing for trapping

Neutering: Medical care and socialization

  1. When ready, a veterinarian performs spay or neuter surgery and provides other medical attention as needed.
  2. During the surgery of feral cats, ear-tipping (removing 3/8 inch or 1 cm from the tip of the left ear; proportionally smaller in a kitten) identifies that the cat has been neutered and treated, when later seen from a distance
  3. Vaccinations are provided as arranged in advance. Common vaccines include rabies and FVRCP, “the ‘distemper’ (panleukopenia) and respiratory virus vaccine”.
  4. Cats found suffering with terminal or untreatable illnesses or injuries are humanely euthanized.
  5. When the vet deems that the cats are ready to leave the clinic, transport them to the recovery area, and monitor them for at least 24 hours.
Neutering Medical care and socialization

Releasing the cats

  1. If the original location is safe, transport the feral cats there and safely release them from their traps or carriers.
  2. Keep tame cats and kittens in foster care until they are adopted.If there are insufficient resources to foster or shelter, the cats may be returned to outdoor locations in the same manner as feral cats.
  3. Feeders of the outdoor locations, providing food, shelter, and medical care, and watching for any new abandoned cats requiring trapping.
Releasing the cats